Jeenode RFM12B configuration commands

The following table shows the differences in intialisations of the RFM12B for the JeeNode applicaiton to receiver weather station data from both FSK and OOK stations, and send it to the JeeNode home sensor network, and eventually to HouseMon:

JeeLib nativeWH1080 FSKJeeLib OOKJeelib native remarkWH1080 FSK RemarkJeeLib OOK
0x82050x820Ddisable some circuitsdisable some circuits
0x80E70x80E7 868 Mhz, enable tx+rxidenticaldisable TX and RX buf
0xA6400xA67C0xA68Afrequency
0xC6130xC6130xC691bitrateN/A ?
0x94A20x94A00x9489134kHz, -0dBm, 91dBm 134kHz, -0dB, 103dBm200khz, -6db, 97dbm
0xC2AC0xC220datafilter = digitaldatafilter = OOK
0xCA830xCA830xCA00identicalFIFO disabled
0xCEnn0xCED4group IDgroupID=0xD4!
0xC4830xC49F0xC473AFC auto, free, DQD4AFC manual slow +-16 DQD2AFC @PWR, auto, +-4 DQD4
0x9850
0xCC770xCC670xCC67PLL don't carePLL don't care
0xE0000xE105wakeup timerdon't care
0xC8000xC80E0xC800disable low duty cycle
0xC0490xC0060xC040clock out, low batt leveldon't caredon't care
0XB8000XB800clear transmit bufferclear transmit buffer
0x82DD0x82DD0x82C0enable relevant circuitsidenticalenab receiver, baseband

taking a look at the differences between the native-FSK and WH1080-foreign-FSK, there seem to be some obvious required differences, but also some differences that may not matter that much. For example the auto frequency control (AFC) settings, auto-mode, unrestricted, versus manual, slow, restricted to +/-16steps may not a big deal. So I tested this by making a sketch that receives foreign-FSK, and as soon as a signal is received, it programs the RFM12B to native mode and transmits the package into the sensor network. I extended the RF12 driver with functions below, which speak for themselves. The minimal set of changes can be seen in the following functions:

void configureWH1080 () {
    rf12_setGroup(0xD4);
    rf12_setBitrate(0x13);          // 17.24 kbps
    rf12_setFrequency(0x67C);       // 868.300 MHz
    rf12_setFixedLength(LEN_MAX);   // receive fixed number of bytes
}

void deconfigureWH1080 () {
    rf12_setGroup(GROUP_ID);
    rf12_setBitrate(0x06);          // 49.2 kbps
    rf12_setFrequency(0x640);       // 868.000MHz
    rf12_setFixedLength(0);         // number of bytes to be received in packet header
}

This approach avoids using the slightly costly rf12_initialize() funnction which reprograms the SPI bus and resets the RFM12B.

If you made it to here, but think what is this all about. See this:

Decoding the Oregon Scientific V2 protocol
Receiving OOKASK with a modified RFM12B
FSK 868MHz weather stations on JeeNode
WH1080 protocol V2 – FSK

Unidentified 868MHz OOK signals

In my attempts to receive weather stations on the 868MHz band, without exact knowledge on for example transmission frequencies, I have performed sweeps of frequency range 867.850 – 869.000 MHz in steps of 20kHz. In the loggings I have been looking for periodic signal. Using a histogram of pulse durations, both on and off durations, I was able to recognize signatures of signals. This approach led to the identification of the following signals:

  • Two Alecto WS4000 or similar weather stations.
  • An Oregon Scientific THN128 433MHz, received at 868MHz band.
  • A Philips outdoor temperature sensor for Philips clock radios, also a 433MHz module

Besides those identified signals, I have several unidentified periodic signals, many with a periodicity of around or exact 30 seconds. I have created some signal catalogue for my own reference, but any help on those signals is appreciated. send me a message on info at sevenwatt com.

WH1080 protocol V2 – FSK

The Fine Offset weather station switched over to a new RF transmission protocol somewhere in 2012. While the old protocol was a On-Off-Keying (OOK) protocol, the V2 protocol used Frequency-Shift-Keying (FSK). This is natural transmision mode of the RFM02 transmitters and their RFM01 receivers. The RFM12B modules can also receive the same FSK signals. Most of the reverse engineering happened on the Raspberry Pi forum: WH1080 V2 protocol decoded

This post details on the exact transmission protocol.


Package definition:
[
preample 3 bytes 0xAA    synchron word    payload 10 bytes  postample 11bits zero
0xAA    0xAA    0xAA     0x2D    0xD4     nnnnn---nnnnnnnnn 0x00     0x0
101010101010101010101010 0010110111010100 101.............. 00000000 000
]
repeated six times (identical packages) per transmission every 48 seconds
There is no or hardly any spacing between the packages.
Spacing: to be confirmed.

When using the RFM01 or RFM12B, the preample and synchron word will not be in the received data. The preamble is intended to have the frequency synthesiser locked, while the synchron word serves as detection of the proper message.
Open issue: How can an end-of-transmission be detected? Would VDI turn into zero?
The payload contains to types of messages for FO WH1080, and relatives:

Payload definition:
Weather sensor reading Message Format:
AAAABBBBBBBBCCCCCCCCCCCCDDDDDDDDEEEEEEEEFFFFFFFFGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHIIIIJJJJKKKKKKKK
0xA4    0xF0    0x27    0x47    0x00    0x00    0x03    0xC6    0x0C    0xFE
10100100111100000010011101000111000000000000000000000011110001100000110011111110


with:
AAAA = 1010    Message type: 0xA: sensor readings
BBBBBBBB       Station ID / rolling code: Changes with battery insertion.
CCCCCCCCCCCC   Temperature*10 in celsius. Binary format MSB is sign
DDDDDDDD       Humidity in %. Binary format 0-100. MSB (bit 7) unused.
EEEEEEEE       Windspeed
FFFFFFFF       Wind gust
GGGG           Unknown
HHHHHHHHHHHH   Rainfall cumulative. Binary format, max = 0x3FF,
IIII           Status bits: MSB b3=low batt indicator.
JJJJ           Wind direction
KKKKKKKK       CRC8 - reverse Dallas One-wire CRC

DCF Time Message Format:
AAAABBBBBBBBCCCCDDEEEEEEFFFFFFFFGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHIIIJJJJJKKKKKKKKLMMMMMMMNNNNNNNN
Hours Minutes Seconds Year       MonthDay      ?      Checksum
0xB4    0xFA    0x59    0x06    0x42    0x13    0x43    0x02    0x45    0x74

with:
AAAA = 1011    Message type: 0xB: DCF77 time stamp
BBBBBBBB       Station ID / rolling code: Changes with battery insertion.
CCCC           Unknown
DD             Unknown
EEEEEE         Hours, BCD
FFFFFFFF       Minutes, BCD
GGGGGGGG       Seconds, BCD
HHHHHHHH       Year, last two digits, BCD
III            Unknown
JJJJJ          Month number, BCD
KKKKKKKK       Day in month, BCD
L              Unknown status bit
MMMMMMM        Unknown
NNNNNNNN       CRC8 - reverse Dallas One-wire CRC

The DCF code is transmitted five times with 48 second intervals between 3-6 minutes past a new hour. The sensor data transmission stops in the 59th minute. Then there are no transmissions for three minutes, apparently to be noise free to acquire the DCF77 signal. On similar OOK weather stations the DCF77 signal is only transmitted every two hours.

The package format was deduced using a long transmision buffer on a JeeNode with some modificaitons in the RF12 driver.
The payload definitions have been described at those pages:
WH1080 V1 OOK protocol
WH1080 V2 FSK protocol
WH1080 V1 OOK and DCF77 message format

This applies at least to the following (later) models:
Fine Offset WH1080
Alecto WS4000
National Geographic 265, at 916MHz

Receiving 868 and 433MHz weather stations

Receiving 868 and 433MHz weather stations

Using an Arduino, JeeNode, Nodo, or Raspberry Pi with RFM12B, RFM01 or superheterodyne receiver, sensors of popular wireless consumer weather stations can be received. Your own, or your neighbors. This article is dedicted to collecting internet source on RF transmission protocols, as the available information seems to be scattered a lot. Oregon scientifc protocols are readily available. Then there semes to be a whole class of OEM weather stations from China, such as Fine Offset. Some of those modesl are avialable as Maplin, Alecto and more. Personally I started with a superheterodyne receiver at 433MHz, with which I was able to recieve my version-1 protocol Orgeon Scientific THN128 sensor, only in the same room. It did not make the next room. But my main sourceof inspiration was this article: http://www.susa.net/wordpress/2012/08/raspberry-pi-reading-wh1081-weather-sensors-using-an-rfm01-and-rfm12b/
which inspired me to invest in HopeRF modules. After I was able to receive Alecto WS4000 or alike stations (two somewhere in the neighborhood, but not the one I aimed at) with a Raspberry Pi, and very noisy with an Arduino Nano, I decided to invest in JeeNodes. Now my “production receiver will be a Jeenode with on-board RFM12B, or added RFM01. To be decided. My experimatal platform is the Raspberry Pi, as I can code easily very sloppy, use large amounts of memory and do all kinds of checks while still being in time for the next pulse.

The following sites/communities have loads of information on receiving weather stations:
http://www.jeelabs.org
http://nodo-domotica.com
The Nodo community is imho a bit difficult to access, as the major source of documentations is the c-code of a userplugin.

Through the following links RF transmission protocols descriptions can be found:
Oregon scientific:
Detailed description of V1, V2, V3 protocols:
http://wmrx00.sourceforge.net/Arduino/OregonScientific-RF-Protocols.pdf
Decoding of the V2 protocol links to jeenode/arduino/atmel code:
http://jeelabs.net/projects/cafe/wiki/Decoding_the_Oregon_Scientific_V2_protocol